Modern-Day Lesson Scripts for Teaching/Learning

Total
0
Shares

Teaching and learning are two sides of the same coin. They are different but related. The activities in the former result in the latter.

Teaching is an activity that is carried out by an agent or medium aimed primarily at modifying how a given target audience will behave, feel or think at the end of a particular experience.

The teacher plans several integrated activities capable of bringing about a change in the behavior of the learners.

The following lesson scripts teach the educators and teachers how teaching-learning should take place in the classroom successfully.

  Script 1

Subject: English language

Class: SS 3

Topic:  Reflexive Pronouns

Introduction

I love myself. How about you, Sade?  Toyin, does your father take you to school, himself? I know all of you enter this class yourselves.

Okay, Amaka, did his assignment herself.  Don’t be afraid, we can go home ourselves because all the teachers have gone home themselves.

That tree broke itself. Myself, himself, herself, ourselves, themselves, and themselves are reflexive pronouns.

Presentation

If you are referring to one person, you will say ‘yourself’. Consider the example below:

Bola, you are deceiving yourself.

Here, you are referring to one person – ‘Bola’.

Compare with this

(ii)        Many of you are deceiving yourselves.

In this sense, you are referring to more than one person – ‘Many’.

The reflexive pronouns must agree with the subjects and vice versa. Let’s consider the following

examples:

(i)         He taught himself.

(ii)        The hooligans blamed themselves.

(iii)       I secretly hide myself.

(iv)       We always feed ourselves.

It is incorrect to say:

(i)         He taught themselves.

(ii)        The hooligans blamed himself.

(iii)       I secretly hide ourselves.

(iv)       We always feed myself

 ‘Theirselves’ does not exist as a reflexive pronoun. Say ‘themselves’ instead.

Progression

A reflexive pronoun may be emphatic or intensive if the emphasis is put on the subject of a

sentence. Consider the following examples:

(i)         He himself told me.

READ ALSO:  Samples of Lesson Notes for Classroom Teaching

(ii)        The money was given to me by Tola herself.

(iii)       The story itself is interesting.

Also, a reflexive pronoun can be emphasized by introducing the word ‘by’. Consider the examples below:

(i)         The students spoke by themselves.

(ii)        You sweep the floor by yourself.

Conclusion

In this lesson, we have learnt a reflexive pronoun is a pronoun used to indicate an action that is effective on the performer.

All reflexive pronouns must agree with subjects of the sentences. A reflexive pronoun occurs in both singular and plural forms of ‘-self’ and ‘-selves’. We shall continue in the next lesson.

Script 2

Subject: English language

Class: SS 3

Topic:  Interrogative Pronouns

Introduction

If I say, what is your name? I ask a question. If I say, where are you coming from, I ask a question. If I say, whose book is this? I ask a question.

Do you know that any WH word that is used to ask questions is interrogative pronouns? Some of the words are what, which, who, what, whose, whom, etc.

Presentation

WH-type question markers give nouns as answers. For example:

(i)         Whom do you wish to work with? Mrreading lessons Zulu.

(ii)        What is your name? Ade.

(iii)       Who took my purse? Sidi.

No preposition, according to modern linguists, must precede any interrogative pronoun. Instead,

it should occur at the end of a sentence. Look at the examples below.

(i)         Whom do you wish to work with?

(ii)        Which city have you been transferred to?

Don’t say:

(i)         With whom do you wish to work?

(ii)        To which city have you been transferred?

Conclusion

This lesson, we have learnt that an interrogative pronoun is a pronoun used to ask someone a question or questions. It begins with a WH-word.

An interrogative pronoun always begins a sentence and is not in the middle of a sentence. We shall continue in the next lesson.

Script 3

Subject: English language

Class: SS 3

Topic:  Relative Pronouns

Introduction

Do you know that a cutlass cannot only cut grasses but can also be used to dig the floor? So also, the words ‘which, who, what, whose, where, whom, etc. cannot only ask the questions but can also be used to mark the clauses.

READ ALSO:  How to Successfully Learn English Registers

Presentation

If such words are used within the clauses, they are relative clauses. Consider the illustrations below.

Though both interrogative pronouns and relative pronouns share the same examples in some respect, they are used differently.

The interrogative pronouns ask questions and occur only at the beginning of a sentence while the

relative pronouns define the noun they follow and they occur in the middle of a sentence.

Compare the following sentences:

(i)         Which do you prefer? (Interrogative pronoun)

(ii)        I have found the pen which you gave me. (Relative pronoun)

(iii)       Who are you? (Interrogative pronoun)

(iv)       I saw the boy who stole my money. (Relative pronoun)

Progression

As said earlier, ‘which’ and ‘who’ in sentences (1) and (iii) are interrogative pronouns because they begin the sentences to ask questions.

But ‘which’ and ‘who’ in sentences (ii) and (iv) are relative pronouns because they occur within the sentences to qualify the nouns – ‘pen’ and ‘boy’ respectively.

Conclusion

In this lesson, we have learnt that a relative pronoun is described as a pronoun used to mark the start of relative/adjectival clauses.

They normally follow the immediate nouns they qualify for in the middle of a sentence. Some of the relative pronouns include who, which, whom, whose, what, what, etc. We shall continue in the next lessons

Script 4

Subject: English language

Class: SS 3

Topic:  Numerical Pronouns

 Introduction

Hello students, who can count 1 to 10? Who wants to score the first position this term? One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, etc. are called cardinals.

The positions such as first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, etc, are called ordinals. Cardinals and ordinals are numerical pronouns.

Presentation

A numerical pronoun does not qualify or modify nouns. It is used as a pronoun. Consider the following sentences:

(i)         Two of the questions are difficult.

(ii)        Second of your suggestions will be supported.

Both cardinals and ordinals can be pre-modified by the article ‘the’. Consider the

following sentences:

(i)         The three of the story I told you are interesting.

READ ALSO:  Best Approach Learn English Registers for External Examinations

(ii)        The first of the matters gives me great concern.

Ordinals should be used with singular verbs. Consider the following sentences:

(i)         The third on my list has a crucial meaning to me.

(ii)        First of them is mine.

It is incorrect to say:

(i)         ‘The third … have …’

(ii)        ‘First … are …’

Progression

Except for one, all other cardinals should be used with plural verbs. Consider the following sentences:

(i)         Five of the students fail the course.

(ii)        The two of the questions are twisted.

Don’t say:

‘Five … fails …’

‘The two … is …’

‘One’ should be followed by a singular verb. For example:

One of those thugs has died. Not ‘One … have died’.

Conclusion

In this lesson, we have learnt that a numerical pronoun is a type of pronoun used to express numbers; singulars, or plurals. A numerical pronoun includes cardinals and ordinals. We shall continue in the next lesson.

Script 5

Subject: English language

Class: SS 3

Topic:  Possessive Pronouns

 Introduction

I own a book; it is mine. You own a bicycle; it is yours. He owns a pen; it is his. She owns a ruler; it is hers.

We own a house; it’s ours. They own cars; they are theirs. ‘Mine, yours, his, hers, ours, and theirs are possessive pronouns.

Consider these illustrations:

(i)         This pen is yours. (thing)

(ii)        Those children are mine. (person)

(iii)       That stadium is ours. (place)

 Presentation

(i)         ‘Yours’ shows the ownership of ‘pen’. It means that it is ‘he/she’ or ‘they’ that own(s) the pen as a possession.

(ii)        ‘Mine’ shows the ownership of ‘children’. It implies that it is ‘he/she’ that owns the children as possessions

(iii)       ‘Ours’ shows the ownership of ‘stadium’. This suggests that it is ‘they’ that own that stadium as a possession.

Conclusion

In this lesson, we have learnt that a possessive pronoun is a pronoun used to express the possession or the ownership of a particular thing, place, and person. We shall continue in the next lesson.

LESSON NOTES FOR MODERN-DAY TEACHING

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You May Also Like